farm-news

Tagged: farm news

22 November, 2019

Farm News

The Villager

This month’s rainfall figures are as follows – 117 mm (4.74 ins) of rain in September and 207.5 (8.4ins) in October. November has already produced 65 mm (2.64 ins) so the wet weather continues. This totals 389.5 mm (15.76ins) since 23rd September. The average rainfall is about 988 mm or 40 ins so you can see how wet it has been – nearly 40% of our annual rainfall in 6 weeks. Although wet here we are so much luckier than those further north with flooded homes, businesses and disruption to their lives. It will stop raining soon – I hope! ...

13 October, 2019

Farm News

The Villager

This month’s rainfall figures are as follows – 117 mm (4.74 ins) of rain in September and October has already produced 50.5 mm (2.04 ins) in the first 8 days. This totals 152.5 mm (6.78ins) in the last 15 days – wet by any UK standards. The ground was dry until the 23rd October and has taken this water well but is now approaching field capacity. ...

18 March, 2019

Farm News

The Villager

The short spell of warm weather in February was glorious and allowed some fieldwork to begin – mostly the first application of fertiliser in the form of nitrogen or sulphur. Both are essential nutrients that plants require to thrive and consequently yield to their potential. The sunshine was great but not enough to dry the soils in this Parish for cultivations and the planting of spring barley, beans and oats that will have to wait but with the day length increasing it will not be long. ...

24 February, 2019

Farm News

The Villager

Rainfall so far in 2019 has been 35 mm or less than an inch and a half so a low total for January. February has started wet with 67.5 mm in the first 10 days but the forecast is dry for the coming week. The ground is much too wet for tractors to travel in the fields without making huge ruts but soon the first fertiliser will be applied to meet the nutritional needs from the plants emerging from the winter – the annual spreading machine MoT is this Tuesday. The test is required to show that the machine is in good order and also to ensure that the spread pattern is accurate so that the granules are distributed accurately over the 24 metre spreading width. Each year the fertiliser varies with some granules being either larger or smaller. If the granules are larger they fly through the air further so the angle of the spreading vanes on the spinning discs are reduced to reduce the throw and vice versa for granules that are on average lighter. A pass certificate is one of the requirements for the Assured Combinable Crops Scheme which allows the grain to be sold under the Red Tractor Assurance label. ...

25 January, 2019

Farm News

The Villager

Julian and I have recently returned from a few days in Snowdonia, an area that we know reasonably well. It is, along with Pembrokeshire, an area that we return to often, the roads are quieter, the scenery is fantastic, people friendly and there are some great places to stay and eat. In driving around, or in Julian’s case cycling, we were reminded how much the environment and income of the area is shaped by sheep. In north Wales in particular it is generally very difficult to grow crops. The soil is too thin and not very fertile and the farms rely on sheep to graze the fields and the steep hillsides. The majority of the visitors to north Wales take the beauty of the area for granted but it only looks the way it does because it is grazed. If the sheep were removed, for whatever reason, the hill sides and fields would quickly return to brambles, small shrubs, bracken and choked with weeds. The footpaths would become unusable and the farms would be deserted. The tourist industry would be affected as, judging by the number of cars parked near climbing routes and footpaths, a lot of the visitors to the National Park do use these trails even in the middle of winter. ...

24 November, 2017

Farm News

The Villager

Harvest and planting are now complete. The wet September changed to a fairly dry October and the winter crops for 2018 harvest were planted and so far are looking pretty good with even emergence and no “holes” (bare patches) evident. The seeding process varies a little between fields but usually consists of the following operations – spraying the stubble of the previous crop to kill the weeds and volunteers (the seed lost from the combine that then germinates), a cultivation to a depth of about 15 cm with 6 legs followed by 2 rows of discs and a heavy press wheel to condition the soil. This pass is fairly rain safe in that it will take about ½ inch of rain without becoming a sodden morass. ...